Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Scenes of early Canada Tea Set

When I babysit for our #2 daughter, I like to use late Aunt May's tea set, part of her Staffordshire china which our daughter inherited. Aunt May is actually a great, great aunt to our daughter and she brought her china from England to Canada when she came over.
The unique thing about this set by Ridgeway is that every piece has a different hand engraving from Bartlett's scenes of early Canada in 1842. The teapot features "The Lake of Two Mountains".
The creamer has "A Shanty on Lake Choutierre", the sugar "A Lake Farm on the Frontier", and the teacups all have "Village of Cedars" on them. The saucers are quite deep and my husband said he remembers his grandfather pouring his hot tea into a saucer and drinking from it. Today's saucers certainly wouldn't hold much tea and I'd not like to try drinking from one. Anyone heard of this before?
My 8 year old grandson used my point and shoot camera to take this photo of his sister and I having afternoon tea. We used the teacups from the kitchen and found a box of chocolate mint Girl Guide cookies to nosh on.
The photo on the wall in the background was taken by our daughter, an accomplished photographer.
In keeping with our pink theme this month, I've included a previously posted photo of a tea tray with the book "Taking Time for Tea" by Diana Rosen.
I'm linking with these tea gatherings:

38 comments:

  1. What a lovely set! Such treasured memories attached! Love the shot of the two of you. I remember my mom pouring tea into our saucers to cool our tea to drink it when we were kids. Thanks for bringing that back to mind!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hello Judith

    Your daughter's Early Canada tea set is very beautiful!

    One can see for example in old films that some people in Finland used to do that with coffee, pour it into a saucer before drinking, perhaps to cool it faster.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hey Judith ... Your Aunt May's tea set is beautiful and such a treasure for your daughter... Unique indeed... What a sweet picture of you and your cute grand-daughter... It's a keeper!!!

    My mother is from Scotland and she had mentioned her father/brothers sometimes drank from the saucers too ( ha Ha) Maybe they broke all the cups ( Hee Hee)..Actually, quite often the tea would pour over the cup into the saucer thus saucer drinking became a bit of a habit amongst the country folks... at least that's what mother says. Lovely post...Hugs

    ReplyDelete
  4. It's a lovely tea set, Judith. I tend to drink tea out a mug, though. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Good morning Judith,
    I LOVE your daughter's tea set! It is a real treasure and I love that each piece has a different scene engraved on it. That is why I enjoy transferware so much. I have heard of the old-timers sipping tea from their saucers. I believe there was a time when it was the common thing to do. Pour a little tea into the saucer so it would cool faster. I appreciate you sharing a little pink too in keeping with my Breast Cancer Awareness theme this month. Have a fabulous day and thanks for joining me for tea.

    Blessings,
    Sandi

    ReplyDelete
  6. Lovely Judith! Some talented photographers in your family! I haven't seen the Canadian Scenes transferware pattern before...how wonderful! I love Ridgeway & transferware. Your tea vignette is lovely! During the late 1700s, when tea was often called Bohea, many cups hadn't handles and so it was cooled to drink in a deep saucer. You run into it in old memoirs, diaries, etc...I think it is mentioned in Lark Rise To Candleford if I remember....
    Lovely post!
    Ruth

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a pretty tea set. I've never heard of this pattern and it's interesting that it came from England. Your granddaughter is so sweet and I'm sure she and her brother enjoy visiting with you and taking tea. I have heard of the custom of pouring tea into the saucer but have never seen it done before. It think it would be quite sloppy and you'd have to sit your cup into the wet saucer after. I read Ruth's comment and I've probably read of this custom in a romance novel. :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. What a beautiful tea set with such unique designs. I remember my grandfather pouring his tea from his cup to his saucer and slurping it rather noisily. My grandmother hated it. He was a German-speaking Russian Mennonite, so the custom seems quite common, from reading the other comments.
    How delightful to share tea with your grandchildren.

    ReplyDelete
  9. What a lovely and unique tea set. Love the pic of you and your granddaughter, she has some pretty curls. I've heard of the drinking out of a saucer too, but I love my tea hot, so I would not want to cool it down!

    ReplyDelete
  10. What a beautiful tea set with a bit of family history. I love that each piece depicts a different scene. I wonder if this tea set inspired your great aunt to come to Canada? My dad (Yorkshire man) also talked of drinking tea from a saucer, but I don't remember him ever doing that. He said you should be able to pour the entire cup of tea into its saucer without it overflowing ... I DO remember him doing this on occasion (much to Mom's angst). I like my tea hotter than the sun, so it would never do for me to want to cool it in this way ;) Nice pic of you & granddaughter enjoying a cuppa! Wendy x

    ReplyDelete
  11. What a gorgeous tea set, and I'm so glad to see it in use. I decided that I would use my favourite china (after moving it all during the kitchen reno). Each time we have tea I now use a different special mug or teacup and enjoy the memories that come with it (perhaps where we bought it or who had it previously) I've heard of drinking from saucers (in the good old days) ... could be because it spilled over, or it was a way to cool down some of the tea.

    ReplyDelete
  12. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hello Dear Judith,
    I am sure that your granddaughter is going to have such wonderful memories of afternoon tea with her lovely grandma. Something that she may keep alive and going . . . it's nice to think that one day she would be the grandma sharing tea and families stories with her granddaughters. That tea set is beautiful and so nice that it is a family heirloom as well. I love family treasures:)
    Have a wonderful day.
    Connie :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. I am loving your tea time with family here and these photos with your grand daughter. That tea set is so special. I have that tea book too to enjoy. You choose a lovely home to take these photos!

    ReplyDelete
  15. The Canada tea set is so pretty, Judith I love teacups and teapots with scenes. It was so nice seeing you and your granddaughter having tea together, and your photo taken by your grandson! Happy tea day!

    ReplyDelete
  16. What a delightful post Judith,
    I loved the gorgeous tea sets. They're so delicate and pretty. I'm a real tea pot myself so will take a peek at that book too ;D
    (My Grandmother used to sip her tea from the saucer, but she wouldn't like me to tell everyone... so that's a secret just between you and me)
    Thank you for sharing
    xoxo

    ReplyDelete
  17. Judith, what a precious time together with your lovely grand-daughter. She is so pretty! (Just as you are, it runs in the family)]

    I think it is wonderful you both are making memories, so very special to do that while you can.

    Your daughter's photography is amazing - and I think your grandson is up-and-coming as well. What a wonderful thing to have confidence behind the lens. Wish I did, styling and design and decorating is like breathing for me - yet I have so much to learn about photography, and I am afraid I am too old/tired/busy/lazy to ever learn to be good at it.

    Ah well, right?

    Blessings to you and yours.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Love the tea cups. Very dainty and pretty. WE do not have afternoon tea as a tradition here, but it is one that surely slows life down and probably helps to recharge to finish out the day. I love the idea of putting out the best china and the prettiest cups.

    ReplyDelete
  19. What a lovely set made more special because of it's history. The grands used to tell stories of their childhood and their 'elders' who drank tea from a 'dish' - saucer - and how old fashioned they thought it was. Lovely photos. And Thin Mints! Yum!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Lovely set- I like the sugar bowl artwork, especially. I bet your granddaughter enjoys the time spent with you over tea.

    ReplyDelete
  21. The heirloom tea set is lovely, and I know you enjoyed using it for Afternoon Tea with your granddaughter. Cherished memories!

    ReplyDelete
  22. I love that tea set. It is so very perfect for Fall. You have the most beautiful tea sets. Have a great week. Blessings, Martha

    ReplyDelete
  23. Such a lovely tea set and such a treasure! So special to have tea with grandchildren!
    Nancy

    ReplyDelete
  24. What a lovely tradition you are building. I had no idea other countries had sets like these. I wonder who else does. Maybe Australia!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Dear Judith,
    the tea set of your Aunt and Daughter looks really like a treasure. So many nice details to develope. I also have heard of drinking from the saucer and when you look at Wikipedias "saucer" you will find it mentioned there, too. Some of the German manufacturers still make those deep saucers like Hutschenreuther and Meissen. The saucers have then no depression for the cup. I dont like that so much because the cup stand better with a depression in the saucer. So sweet to see you with your granddaughter. I think you had fun together with that tea time. Thank you for sharing this wonderful moment.
    Best greetings, Johanna

    ReplyDelete
  26. Lovely picture of you and your granddaughter. It's a,ways interesting to learn about how tea sets came about in ones life. It something we can treasure and pass on to our children and our children's children.

    Hope you are having a good week.

    Blessings,
    Aida

    ReplyDelete
  27. Just such a lovely tea set and I have seen others that seem to show different scenes painted on each piece in the sets, at antique markets. Your granddaughter looks a lot like you. I know that you enjoyed your time together~

    ReplyDelete
  28. Hello Judith.
    Your daughter's tea set is beautiful!
    It is very interesting to see Early Canada tea set with unique designs.Thank you for sharing. How lovely to see you enjoying your tea time with your granddaughter. She is adorable and your smile is beautiful!
    I hope you have a lovely week.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Beautiful tea set Judith, and great that you can use it with your beautiful granddaughter!

    ReplyDelete
  30. What a lovely tea with your granddaughter and the special china!

    ReplyDelete
  31. The teaset of late Aunt May is gorgeous and the story is a great memory. Lovely to have tea with your granddaughter, nice picture of you two.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Wonderful traditions to pass down and share, Judith...:)JP

    ReplyDelete
  33. You always feature the most beautiful china. These are especially pretty. Your grandson did a good job on the photo! And I can see that a good photographic eye runs in the family.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Oh what a unique and lovely set! I am very happy to see it featured here...never knew of it before. (I think I say that a lot here.) Your grandson is following in his mother's footsteps...lovely picture of you and your granddaughter.

    ReplyDelete
  35. It is a lovely tea set!! How nice that you still use it too. I have heard of people pouring tea into the saucer to cool it before pouring it back into the cup, and also drinking from the saucer, but for what reason I cannot remember. Also, when tea cups first came into being, they were in fact tea bowls and had no handles, so perhaps using the saucer comes from that somehow? xx

    ReplyDelete
  36. Absolutely lovely, every bit of it, Judith! I had never seen that pattern before but how special and perfect for this occasion.

    Wishing you a lovely weekend.

    G

    ReplyDelete
  37. What a lovely tea set, and so nice to see you and your granddaughter.

    ReplyDelete
  38. How lovely to have these pretty teawares that are also so meaningful to you as a Canadian. (I have an Aunt May too, but if she has any teawares I've never heard about them!)

    I wanted to let you know that YES, I have heard about tea being sipped from saucers! I'm pretty sure this practice is mentioned in one of my tea history books, and if I ever come across the passage again I'll be sure to let you know. I do remember that it was for the very reason it sounds like your husband's grandfather did it, to cool off the hot tea.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for dropping by and taking the time to leave a comment.
If you have a 'no reply' status on your blog I hope you'll consider changing this to enable others to email a question or continue a conversation from the comments.
Judith

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...