Sunday, September 8, 2013

Do You Believe?

Do you believe in the folklore surrounding the predictions of winter?
Here we have the wooly bear caterpillar and larval stage of the isabella tiger moth.  Supposedly a wide brown/rust section predicts a mild winter while a narrow band forewarns of a harsh one.  
The amount of berries and nuts on trees in autumn determines a mild or harsh winter.  Above are the oakleaf mountain ash and crabapple in our backyard.  Both are just loaded this year compared to fall of 2012 when there were hardly any berries on the mountain ash.  
I don't know whether the wooly bear sections can determine what type of winter we'll encounter, but I have watched the berries on trees for a number of years and Mother Nature is pretty accurate about providing extra food before a rough winter.  I believe.
I'm linking with Mosaic Monday.

24 comments:

  1. I believe! Mother Nature is such a good indicator of what lies ahead.

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  2. A friend was discussing the woolly bear caterpillar the other day on Facebook. The ones here seem to be indicating a harsh winter. I haven't noticed the berries much though. As far as I'm concerned winter is just winter. :)

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  3. I totally believe in the woolly bears! Years ago, I saw some all black ones-- an older aunt of mine said that meant a bad winer coming, and she was so right!! Visiting from Lavender Dreams blogroll.

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  4. My Mother was one that believed in that too. Everytime I see one I think of Her and than the weather. Thanks for the memory.

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  5. I hear the Farmer's Almanac is right on their predictions 80% of the time, and they too predict a cold winter. Love your mountain ash! We had a European mtn ash but it turned out to be a rather short-lived tree. I miss it. Hope you are having a good wknd, Judith.
    Hugs, Beth

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  6. That Caterpillar is amazing! I think I'll trust Mother Nature and her predictions too!!

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  7. Yes, but what do they have to say about autumn? ;> That's all I care about right now.

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  8. You know Judith, I believe you. I have seen a lot of berries lately so. We might get a cold winter, I like it.
    Have a nice week

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  9. Some make fun and say these are old wives tales, but God always sends us signs if we take the time to see, (and believe!) I'm with you.
    Hugs,
    Patti

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  10. Do if I understand, you are looking forward to a challenging winter! Interesting, and the photos are interesting! Good post.

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  11. The squirrels here seem to be extra busy gathering pine nuts, they have been since July. They are even cutting the green pine cones from the trees and shredding them. Last time we saw this behavior was the winter of 2010/2011 where we had 200% of snowfall we usually get. We were snowed in for over a week and got 2 feet an hour some days. So it seems winter may be rough all over the US. I am in CA.

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  12. The extra nuts makes sense, I do hope it is not a real bad winter. I could do without the snow and ice. Great post, thanks for sharing. Have a happy week!

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  13. We always looked for the 'wooly worm' in the Fall to see what the winter would hold in the mountains of NC. And what a treat to see the mountains ash. We have such different critters and plants here in FL! Sweet hugs!

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  14. Not the news I want to hear. All those berries say a long, cold, snow filled winter:(

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  15. I have a whole new outlook on caterpillers!! :)

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  16. Yes, I believe and I believe that these folk traditions are probably more accurate than today's tech savvy weather people.

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  17. I know my Crabapple is loaded with berries. Don't know if it determines anything or not so we'll see what happens this Winter.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  18. Hi,Judith
    I think that in many cases folk traditions are probably more accurate than today's new technology. In Japan we have some folk traditions to predict earthquake. Some of them are very accurate. it is surprising!

    My English teacher is a Canadian man. I just learned from him that for animals,it is very tough in winter. So animals that hibernate eat so much in fall! I hope severe snow winter will not come for them too.
    Tomoko

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  19. Oh I believe alright! Mother Nature knows what she is doing; we just have to listen and observe.

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  20. Oh dear. I don't want to think about winter yet. And I live on the west coast where it's always pretty mild. But I do love these summery September days.
    Interesting about the predictions we see in nature. I think they are often good predictors. Being observant is important.

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  21. OH no Judith! I hope the winter is mild; we had such a rough one last year. You know, In England it was too cold int eh spring and we hardly got any plums but the apples are so plentiful we don't know what to do with them. I love mountain ashes. In my old house I had a glorious tree which I loved to bits. Maybe I should plant a mountain ash in this new garden too. Happy Monday and I hope you have a lovely week. :)

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  22. We have a bumper crop of apples this year as last year we had nary a one. The sour cherries made a very nice pie but now the leaves have completely fallen off the tree. Valerie

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  23. I do not so much believe in the folklore, however, when they are very black, we do seem to have bad Winters, and I saw a single worm about a month ago, and it was all black and very wooly...we shall thus see ;)

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  24. I also believe that nature does give us some accurate predictions...haven't had a chance to see any signs yet.

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Judith

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