Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Late summer fireworks

It is said that in Europe, goldenrod is a much sought after plant for the garden.  Here in America where it grows freely along roadsides and in fields, it's considered a weed and often blamed for the nastiness of hay fever. (we all know it's ragweed)  Many native plants are listed in resource books as both a pretty wildflower and a lowly weed. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, is it not?
For me, I've always loved the yellow glow of goldenrod flowers and I like to observe all the insects that find them a source of nectar.
Occasionally the native goldenrod will creep into the garden beds and I let it stay.
The yellow flowers look amazing paired with fall asters.
Purple coneflower is right at home too with goldenrod.  And, of course I've saved the best for last.  For when the native variety is slowly fading away, the hybrid 'Fireworks' is just starting to explode.  
Forming large upright clumps with long waving branches, some would not even recognize it as a goldenrod.
Even in the winter, 'Fireworks' remains a plant of interest.
I hope I have convinced you to try this plant in your garden if you're not already growing it.  Mine never get watered or fertilized and have taken the hot weather this summer like real troupers.
I'm linking with Tracie over at Fishtail Cottage for Cottage Flora Thursday.

36 comments:

  1. Hi Judith... your goldenrod is very beautiful, especially with the blue piece in the background. Thanks for visiting my site and your note. I am aware of the red lily beetle in Vermont where much of my family lives and I grew up. I'm not at all sure how far west it has moved, but what a tragedy. Thankfully I haven't heard of it around here as yet. I have been very concerned about us getting Japanese beetles as well... they have been within seven miles of here for the past two years, but again, no sign of them in our gardens. Now, if we were only so lucky regarding mosquitoes. I had them all killed off a week ago at a cost of $40 in spray and today they're all back. Can't have everything I wish for I guess!! Have a great week!! Larry

    ReplyDelete
  2. The Goldenrod is beautiful! When I was a child my mom would have terrible allergies and it was from the "Ragweed"! It's one thing I never thought to plant in my garden. I have let the milkweed grow this year.
    -Lynn

    ReplyDelete
  3. It is very pretty as it droops downward. I think I pull it out of my small flower beds, or something like it. Even my grass is sometimes a weed when it's in my flower beds.♥♫

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks, Judith, for pointing me to this plant. I'm always after plants that can survive once the rains stop here and we go into drought conditions (hard to imagine, this year, but it's started). I love that flash of yellow against the purple in your flower bed.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I totally agree with you about Goldenrod...I grow a bit of it, but I wish I could have more ~ it really isn't too happy here, and it is so pretty!

    It was so nice of you to visit me and leave such a nice comment on my Rudbeckia and mailbox post. Have a great day!

    ReplyDelete
  6. You have convinced me! I love 'Fireworks'. I have never heard of it before, but you can bet I will be looking for it now. I think it would look great in a big tall flower bouquet.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hey I like your goldenrod too. I have mine planted in waves too. Trying to get it to fill out some of the back acres.
    Ohio Outdoors

    ReplyDelete
  8. I agree that goldenrod in along roads and in fields looks pretty. I don't know the plant, fireworks, but it sure makes a nice fallish addition to the garden and looks beautiful in winter's snow too. Thanks for the information on it. Have a great day.

    ReplyDelete
  9. How lovely! Growing up in a home where we all suffered with allergy to "ragweed" it was spoken of in one breath with goldenrod. I always thought they were of the same ilk. We have a marvelous goldenrod field near our home which I photographed a number of years ago. I think it was one of the last times I used a 35 MM film camera. Perhaps I shall venture there again to see what I can get digitally.
    Joy!
    Miss Kathy

    ReplyDelete
  10. I love your goldenrod and your coneflowers too...beautiful garden!
    My first time to visit but I'll be back!

    Have a wonderful day!!

    ReplyDelete
  11. My brother has some planted on his farm. I wish I had room for it but it looks it's best as big clumps like you both have. I just don't have room unfortunately. Yours is gorgeous too.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi,Judith.
    Goldenrose are very common in Japan too. They can be seen in fields and along rivers. They look very beautiful, but unfortunately they are considered to be one of causes of serious hayfever. I enjoy seeing them in the distance!!! So bright yellow!
    Tomoko.

    ReplyDelete
  13. It is so nice to know that there is at least one other person who does not think goldenrod is just a weed! You have shown that so beautifully here. Your photographs are wonderful!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I have never seen that plant here but I like how it blooms later in the season.

    Carolyn

    ReplyDelete
  15. Judith, the goldenrod is lovely....the color is just stunning!

    Barb

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hello from Bronteland in Yorkshire, England! I'm browsing in other people's gardens while we are soaked by heavy summer rain. I agree about the sunny goldenrod: many so-called weeds are pretty wild flowers in the right setting, aren't they? I saw a bank of the beautifully-named Rosebay Willowherb at sunset the other day, and they were as lovely as any cultivated flower! Many thanks for sharing your delightful garden and wonderful blog; I will return!
    Jane Gray

    ReplyDelete
  17. Beautiful in every season!
    Delighted to meet you sharing a cup of tea
    Love

    ReplyDelete
  18. Your goldenrod is so pretty! very cheerful..love the way it drapes downward
    *hugs*deb

    ReplyDelete
  19. Thank you for visiting and your sweet comment. We have wild goldenrod throughout our property and some has made its way to the gardens and we have left it too... but I did not know the name of it. Wishing you a fabulous week-end..xo HHL

    ReplyDelete
  20. I love the mixture of goldenrod and coneflowers.....My garden is full of both and make such beautiful arrangements.....

    Yours are fantastic....

    ReplyDelete
  21. I think goldenrod is Nebraska's state flower which is my "home" state (I know live in MN)..it CRACKS me up that it is like a weed..no shock there...I kind of felt that Nebraska was a little like a weed too! HA! BTW, wow, thanks for your comments on my blog post for Frosting for the Cause. It was hard to write that post as we have kept things so private for so long but it feels good to out myself a bit! HA! :) Hugs...Trish

    ReplyDelete
  22. YIKES...I KNOW how to use KNOW and NOW..really I do...you would never KNOW NOW and then as I do type too fast for my brain :)

    ReplyDelete
  23. Goldenrod is such a pretty wildflower! Thank you for helping to spread the message that it does not make people sneeze!! It's so sad that people mistakenly blame Goldenrod for their allergies, when it is the Ragweed that is at fault. I don't even think the two plants look alike. Their leaves are totally different!

    ReplyDelete
  24. I've never planted Goldenrod! I love it though and think it will be pretty in my garden. I'm going to look into this! :)

    Thank you for visiting me today. I'm late getting around...burning the midnight oil.

    Love to you~

    Rebecca

    ReplyDelete
  25. That pop of blue at the end of the path. It breaks all the rules- AND makes the garden pop with life.

    AWESOME!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Just fantastic, even in winter! Wow.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Hi Judith,

    I have goldenrod growing behind the back of my pond, but it hasn't started to bloom yet. I love the way the branches drape. Soon I will have some. Your pictures are just lovely.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Gee...I had some Goldenrod..I dont know where it went! I better plant it again as it is a wonderful flower. Looks great in arragements too. I love yellow flowers. You sure have a lot of it...

    ReplyDelete
  29. I'm feeling a bit warm right now and enjoyed seeing the snowy shot! The plant does have a nice silhouette in the winter.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi Judith, Lovely post, beautiful goldenrod. I even enjoyed seeing that winter shot from months ago, which seems like so long ago now that it's been so hot and dry. I'm thankful we got some rain today.
    Blessings, Beth

    ReplyDelete
  31. I think the Goldenrod is beautiful to. Your photo of it paired with the Coneflower is stunning. What a combination!

    Nancy

    ReplyDelete
  32. I vote pretty wildflower! Also, LOVE your idea for nests & rock eggs outdoors.
    :)
    Wishing you a beauty-filled weekend, Judith!
    Hugs,
    Zuzu

    ReplyDelete
  33. Beautiful flowers. Have a nice day. Greetings from Romania.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Thanks for stopping by my herb garden, Judith. Love, love, love 'Fireworks' although mine tends to migrate and explode in other parts of the garden where I may not want them! Mine hasn't quite started to bloom. Lucky you.

    ReplyDelete
  35. This is a lovely plant! I think I would like to have some in my garden. Do you know if it is deep tolerant?

    Charlotte

    ReplyDelete
  36. Hello,Judith.
    I am visiting again!
    Regarding your goldenrod in your garden, I feel sorry the beautiful goldenrod in your garden. Goldenrod and ragweed are different type of flowers! I did not know about that.
    Thank you for giving me for information on that!
    Tomoko.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for dropping by and taking the time to leave a comment.
If you have a 'no reply' status on your blog I hope you'll consider changing this to enable others to email a question or continue a conversation from the comments.
Judith

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...